Dr Keith McGuinness

Dr Keith McGuinness
keith-mcguinness's picture
Seinor Research Fellow, Ecologist, Senior Lecturer - Zoology
Primary research group: 
Environmental Science Learning and Teaching
Qualifications: 
BSc (Hon), University of Sydney, 1981 PhD, University of Sydney, 1985
Phone: 
+61 8 8946 6709

Biography

Keith McGuinness' main areas of research are the ecology of marine communities - particularly those in intertidal regions, especially mangroves - and environmental impact assessment and monitoring.

Over the last ten years, he has also been working with staff from CDU, eriss and AIMS on approaches to the design and analysis of impact assessment and monitoring programs, particularly in aquatic systems.

Keith teaches biology, ecology and experimental design and analysis.

Research interests

Keith's main areas of interest are the ecology of marine communities - particularly those in intertidal regions, especially mangroves - and environmental impact assessment and monitoring. Since 2000, he has also been working with staff from CDU, eriss and AIMS on approaches to the design and analysis of impact assessment and monitoring programs, particularly in aquatic systems.

Current projects

  • KS Gibb KS, Parry DL, McGuinness KA, Smith MK, Anderson JV. Coastal monitoring using metal resistant microbes
  • Humphrey, C, Buckle, D, McGuinness, KA. Statistical design and analysis for ARR stream monitoring protocols
  • Gibb K, Streten-Joyce C, Glasby C, McGuinness K. Polychaetes as indicators of disturbance in Darwin Harbour: a molecular approach
  • Gibb, KS, Parry, DP, Blackall L, Padovan, A, Alvarez de Glasby, B, McGuinness, KA. Microbiology of marine sponges in a high nutrient environment
  • Professor David Parry, Associate Professor Karen Gibb, Dr Anna Padovan, Dr Claire Streten-Joyce, Dr Jeffrey Tsang, Dr Keith McGuinness. Pilot study on the distribution and relative abundance of bacterioplankton (including vibrio) in southern Melville Bay
  • Gibb KS, Parry DP, Stretten-Joyce C, McGuinness KA. Waste Pond microbes