WOMEN´S TIME USE MAPPING. Changes after the Improvement of the Water System in rural Timor-Leste

WOMEN´S TIME USE MAPPING. Changes after the Improvement of the Water System in rural Timor-Leste

Before an upgrade of the water system, 12 communities from six Municipalities were selected in 2013 to undertake a Time Use Mapping activity with the objective of collecting baseline data on what a ‘normal’ day consisted of for women in rural communities. 

The metric used in this study is a single time use snapshot, using PRA methodology, and applied to women-based groups. It is repeated three years later in the same communities, after an improvement to their water systems. Gender-segregated FGDs captured the extent of the changes for women, families, communities, and women´s opportunities for other activities.

In 2013, water collection was identified as a task undertaken mainly by women, and to a lesser degree by children, requiring an average of three hours a day. In 2016, the average time spent fetching water every day had decreased to 30 minutes. Women currently save an average of two and a half hours of their daily time on collecting water as a result of the improved water system.

A measurable change in time use for other reproductive activities was not reported during the TUM activity, yet the ease with which these tasks were done had improved, even if taking the same amount of time. In terms of productive activities, more groups reported establishing kitchen gardens and
spending more time doing this.

Gianna Bonis-Profumo's picture
Gianna Bonis-Profumo
PhD Candidate

Primary research group

Natural Resources-Based Livelihoods

Qualifications

MA Development Studies (Anthropology); Grad Dip Management of Non-Profit Organisations; BA Political Sciences